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My relationship with carpentry started with my grandfather, who lived in a farm house, and had a workshop where he did some general repairs, built the structures he needed for the land and some furniture. 

After that, my father, an engineer and restless, who always preferred to create or repair everything he had, kept intriguing me with being able to build the surrounding objects with his own hands.

From my grandpa, I keep as a souvenir the pencil he used in his workshop (which is in the picture that illustrates the introduction page of this site), and from my dad, I take many of the tools I use to build what is photographed here.

From both of them, natural accumulators, I learned the craft and the appreciation for building my own objects and organizing spaces. 

My professional background is in photography, and since the beginning of this trajectory, my greatest interest has always been to capture interiors, from abandoned spaces for my authorial work, to interiors designed by professionals and portrayed for publicity and publications.

I see photography as a two-dimensional way of organizing space. The frame is my square meter, and in this area, I organize the elements to create a harmonic image, with its lines, its objects, its voids, lights and shadows.

I believe that the creation of a good image depends on a dialogue between who is behind the camera and the object to be photographed. And my work in carpentry is based on that same idea.

 

Apart from the exercise of the craft itself, which teaches me something new in each new project, and a lot of practice over the years rearranging furniture over coffee at a friend's house, my gaze, my sensitivity and my technical skills come from these two schools. Photography and my family.